Get Creative at BETT 2007- reflecting on yet another busy show


For the sixth year it was nice to be invited back to be a part of ‘Create at BETT’, the creativity feature at the BETT Show held at London Olympia between the 10th and 13th of January. Create at BETT continues to be the only stand staffed by young people, not selling anything specific.
The feature stand exists to simply demonstrate creative use of technology within learning. Last year BETT attracted 27,000 visitors from all over the world to its two thousand stands.Students from King Harold School were on hand to help visitors make podcasts, using the latest chroma key technology from our friends at Reflecmedia.
Visitors were able to stand in front of a chroma wall with selected moving image being rendered live behind them straight into Apple’s iMovie software.teswriteup.jpg
Click the right hand news article image to read what reporter Stephen Manning from the TES had to say about the young people working on the Create at BETT stand:

The young people working on the stand worked with the show visitors to film their ideas and then upload the newly created podcast file to the Digital Teacher Network (DTN). DTN remains as a free space for creative teachers to manage their projects online.
All the podcasts created on the ‘Create at BETT’ stand can be viewed on the ‘Create at BETT DTN Project‘.
All DTN project media files work with iTunes, and are therefore available to download as podcasts onto iPod technology.At the other end of the stand young people worked to demonstrate the brilliant iStopMotion animation software and the potential for using creative technology in the classroom. iStopMotion is so simple and easy to use, yet so powerful too. A wonderful piece of innovative software.
Cleveratom was represented on the stand working together with the team from BBC Blast and Apple. All these partners believe in creative use of new and emerging technology in learning and we’re proud to work along side them.
I’ve enjoyed the past six years on the stand, clicking here will take you back to the stand in 2002 where we explored web broadcasting technologies.
We’ve done something new and experimental on the stand every year since, it has always been staffed by young people. Here is last years article on BETT 2006.
Cleveratom’s Alex Blanc and Jamie Harris were on hand to support visitors wanting to learn more about the potential of enabling technologies. Alex built Digital Teacher Network from Open Source Software and spent a lot of time explaining to visitors how it worked and what they could do with it. Maureen Gurr was on hand to look after the young people, Fiona from Impact also did an amazing logistical job to make it all happen.
Cleveratom staff have also worked closely with David Baugh and BBC Blast to support the young people prior to coming to the show. The training session held before Christmas in the BBC’s 21CC (21st Century Classroom) were a huge success. Creativity and School Learning Space Design Consultant, Hal MacLean reflects on the performance of the young people:
As ever, King Harold School pupils were brilliant! Their enthusiasm, infectious energy and determination to succeed meant that the stand never had a dull moment. Many thanks to Malcolm Burnett for organising the group and being there with them.
Read more of what Hal has to say here.
View Hal’s Best Pictures from BETT 2007
Some images from the event:

View even more of Hal’s Pictures from BETT 2007

Check out some of the podcasts below:

Mountain Report: Play Now | Play in Popup
Duncan: Play Now | Play in Popup
Worms: Play Now | Play in Popup
Domizio: Play Now | Play in Popup
Man and Girl: Play Now | Play in Popup
Eating the Sky: Play Now | Play in Popup
Weather Report: Play Now | Play in Popup
 

White Court School Students get creative at Ultralab in the first 30 minute film school

We experimented with a ‘One Hour Film School’ assisted by children from White Court School in Braintree, Essex.
The plan was to find out if it was possible to teach how to use Apple’s iMovie software and Canon cameras in 30 minutes and for the children to then make a film without any adult help in a further 30 minutes. It worked, and here are the 30 second films, completely planned and made by the children.
The lessons learnt from the pilot activity went forward to create the hour and a half training sessions for all future Summer School events.
Team:
Colin Elsey (Ultralab)
Matthew Eaves (Ultralab)
Alice Mitchell (Ultralab)
Richard Millwood (Ultralab)
George Variopoulos (Ultralab)
The finished films are called ‘Watch Top of the Pops’, ‘Wonder Water’, ‘The Mummy Returns’ and ‘Friends’, here they are:
Wonder Water
Watch Top of the Pops
The Mummy Returns
Friends